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ANSYS 2019 R3

Matt’s Maker Space Gives ANSYS’ Take Your Child to Work Day a STEM Focus

A coloring robot created at a Matt’s Maker Space

ANSYS has invited Matt’s Maker Space to run its 2019 Take Your Child to Work Day (TYCTWD) event.

“It’s a great honor and a great opportunity,” says Noelle Conover, co-creator of Matt’s Maker Space. “It’s important that companies take the time to plan TYCTWD events. For our makerspace, and ANSYS, it’s important that this day also revolve around science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).”

She explains that the best part about makerspaces is seeing the children embrace the engineering design process. “The children imagine how to design something, build it and make it all over again so they can fix mistakes,” says Conover.

As a result, teaching the engineering process will be the backbone of the ANSYS TYCTWD event. The children will participate in bridge making activities, design challenges, slime making and more.

“We want the parents to know that when they bring their children it’s not baby-sitting,” says Conover. “We are showing them what it means to be in STEM. We want to make sure the children learn every step of the engineering design process.”

Dave Conover, co-creator of Matt’s Maker Space and an ANSYS employee, notes: “Additive manufacturing is rapidly expanding into the engineering field, and makerspaces are the perfect venue to develop the kind of collaborative and creative minds necessary to unleash its potential.”

The Treasured STEM-Based History Between Matt’s Maker Space and ANSYS

Dave (left) and Noelle (right) Conover are the creators of Matt’s Maker Space.

It’s no surprise that Matt’s Maker Space was asked to run the TYCTWD event at ANSYS.

The two organizations have had a cherished relationship since the start of the Matt’s Maker Space charity, which was founded in honor of Noelle and Dave Conover’s son, who lost a tragic fight with cancer.

“ANSYS and the community were wonderful to Dave and me,” says Noelle Conover. “Seventeen years later, we wanted to give back to the community and its school district.”

“The school district told us about makerspaces, and it was the perfect opportunity because our whole family is in STEM. As a woman in STEM, I was particularly excited to encourage the tech leaders of tomorrow. What started as a $175,000 gift and seven makerspaces has now grown to 14. We have locations in elementary schools, nursery schools, libraries and even a children’s hospital.”

When Noelle and Dave Conover started Matt’s Maker Space, they spoke to ANSYS to see if the company could help. “It made perfect sense to ANSYS,” Noelle Conover says. “Makerspaces could very well help prepare the company’s next generation of employees. This sentiment, to train the STEM leaders of tomorrow, will continue in the ANSYS and Matt’s Maker Space TYCTWD event and beyond.”

To learn more about ANSYS’ STEM initiatives, read the academic page.

To learn more about Matt’s Maker Space, click here.

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