Healthcare Industry Webcast Series: Discovering and Adopting in Silico Modeling

Ninety-six percent of the top 50 healthcare companies in the world are using engineering simulation and computer-based models routinely. Leading medical device companies are realizing that a large fraction of their engineering force should be using simulation regularly. The FDA and other regulatory authorities encourage the adoption of computer models and simulation (CM&S) — also known as the “in silico” approach — to accelerate the approval process. But many companies are still unsure of how best to adopt and deploy this technology. This monthly webcast series shares the knowledge and experience of ANSYS experts and our partners to guide you in the strategic adoption of engineering simulation.


Webinars on Demand

New Orthopedic Shoulder Implants: Optimized through Patient Specific Multiphysics Modeling

For more than 20 years, the orthopedic sector has widely adopted engineering simulation and finite element analysis to accelerate the development of new implants. Today, most hip prostheses, knee joints and spinal implants are optimized through computer modeling. During the last few years leading orthopedic companies have developed an in silico testing approach, which enables them to test new prototypes on a relatively large population of virtual patients.

Attend this webinar to learn how ANSYS simulation solutions can give you a more detailed understanding of all articulations including the shoulder, elbow, wrist and ankle. For patient-specific implants to become standard, including synovial fluid and electromagnetic interaction modeling are the obvious next steps. Learn about a workflow that takes you from patient to simulation, while including fluid–structure interaction behavior in your shoulder model.

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Democratizing Medical Simulation with ANSYS AIM

Though engineering simulation has demonstrated its value for the design of medical device and pharmaceutical processes, the complexity of multiphysics phenomena together with the lack of CAE-educated experts has slowed its large-scale adoption. The need for a customizable multiphysics platform that can be used by non-experts is perhaps more obvious for healthcare applications than for any other industry. At the same time, the platform cannot sacrifice accuracy for ease of use.

Attend this webinar to learn about ANSYS AIM, an easy-to-use simulation environment designed for all engineers. Discover the integrated single-discipline and multiphysics solutions based on best-in-class solver technologies in a modern, new, immersive user environment that enables engineers to rapidly evaluate product design performance with confidence.

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How the InSilicoTrials.com Platform Can Help Define Good Simulation Practices

Recent reports by the EU Council and U.S. Congress encourage a number of innovative approaches to streamline the regulatory approval process for approving medical devices, including the large-scale adoption of computer-based models. The extensive use of simulation in clinical research will lead to the definition of Good Simulation Practice (GSP) standard guidelines for computer modeling and testing as Good Clinical Practices (GCP) are used in traditional clinical trials.

Attend this webinar to learn how the web-based platform, InSilicoTrials.com, will provide healthcare companies with an easy-to-use tool to perform computational testing on their devices during the development and validation process.

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How to Successfully Address Embedded Software Challenges for the Medical Device Industry

With the rapid increase of biotronics, especially wearable and implantable electronic medical devices, the pressure on biosoftware engineers to produce code to complement the hardware is growing rapidly. This code must be able to properly interpret large amounts of continuously acquired data and to deduce relevant diagnoses, possibly leading to immediate actions. Because many of these products and systems will be safety critical — defibrillators, for example — the control software must operate flawlessly and satisfy stringent software safety certification requirements from regulatory authorities (FDA, EU, etc.).

Attend this webinar to discover how the ANSYS model-based embedded software development and simulation environment — with a built-in (and safety certified) automatic code generator — significantly accelerates the pace of embedded software development projects, including complex user interfaces and control software. Learn how the use of familiar ANSYS tools can help medical engineers make mobile health smarter and more effective.

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How Simulation is Assisting with the Adoption of Internet of Things Through the Development of Smart Medical Implants

Digital health is taking healthcare by storm and is expected to reach $233.3 billion by 2020, driven particularly by the mobile health market. Connected medical devices and associated services are perceived to be able to offer safer and more effective healthcare. Novel connected medical device examples include Saluda’s closed-loop neuromodulation system for pain management, EBR’s wireless pacing system and St Jude Medical’s wireless-enabled pacemaker – all examples of implants with wireless connectivity.

A key challenge for medical device designers is to understand and optimize the communication between the device and the receiver. Pioneering companies like Cambridge Consultants were early adopters of engineering simulation to model the behavior of medical devices and their communication components, together with the surrounding environment – and particularly ‘through-body’ communication. In this webinar, we will discuss the growing importance of connectivity and the necessity of using computer-based modeling to enable this critical technology. Cambridge Consultants will also present a case study that highlights the use of computer modeling to quantify the impact of different body morphologies on implant radio performance. An understanding of these coupled with use case and end user morphology will define if the radio performance is incredibly successful or marginally adequate.

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Leveraging Engineering Simulation in the Development of Vaccine Delivery Devices

Intranasal delivery can provide better protection than traditional injected vaccines for diseases such as influenza due to mucosal and cross-protection. But current intranasal delivery technology uses expensive and difficult-to-manufacture vaccines inefficiently. Creare has recently developed two novel vaccine delivery devices: a dry powder inhaler (DPI), which effectively delivers the vaccine dose to targeted regions of the nasal tract; and an ultra-compact InVaxTM intranasal nebulizer for liquid vaccines, which is an optimal platform for large-scale influenza vaccination.

Attend this webinar to learn how Creare used ANSYS Fluent for aerodynamic design and nasal deposition modeling in support of the DPI device development. Discover how analyses performed with ANSYS Mechanical were used to design the piezoelectric actuator, a key component in the aerosol generation process for the InVax device.

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10 Compelling Reasons to Upgrade to ANSYS 17.0 for Healthcare Applications

In silico medicine enables doctors to customize a treatment based on simulations run on models of the patient’s own anatomical geometry, which can be obtained from various scanning methods. Such patient-specific treatments understandably achieve better clinical results. ANSYS 17.0, with hundreds of enhancements across all physics, could be a significant catalyst in the discovery of many more devices and applications in this expanding medical sector.

Attend this webinar to learn how advances in ANSYS 17.0 could boost medical innovation by a factor of ten (10x) by accelerating computation time, increasing adoption of simulation by non-expert users, and multiplying the reliability and safety of new medical devices. Discover 10 reasons why enhancements to ANSYS fluid, mechanical, electronic and systems simulation software can benefit all healthcare sectors — cardiovascular, orthopedic, pharmaceutical, hospital and medical supplies, diagnosis — through increased use of in silico medicine.

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How Engineering Simulation can Facilitate the Addition of Internet of Things to Medical Devices
by Sara Louie, ANSYS, Inc.

Healthcare providers are demanding technologies that reduce overall costs for the prevention or management of chronic illnesses. This category includes technologies that use devices that constantly monitor health indicators; devices that auto-administer therapies; or devices that track in real-time when a patient self-administers a therapy. Engineering simulation solutions from ANSYS are making medicine participatory, personalized, predictive and preventive (P4 medicine) via the medical Internet of Things (IoT).

Attend this webinar to learn how medical device engineers are designing IoT devices with increasing requirements for thermal and power management, ruggedness, miniaturization, number of sensors, wireless capabilities, MR compliance, etc. Discover how ANSYS simulation solutions have the potential to increase both the effectiveness and affordability of healthcare by expanding the medical IoT.

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Vertical Medical Applications: Bringing Simulation to Clinicians
by Thierry Marchal, ANSYS; Luc Boronat, Rodin 4d; and Mathieu Sanchez, Sim & Cure

For years clinicians have progressively discovered the benefits that engineering simulation can bring to medicine. Still, fidelity of simulation for a large variety of patients, computational time and ease of use of existing general purpose tools have remained strong entry barriers to simulations for doctors. Now, building on their long medical and engineering experience and taking advantage of new ANSYS 17.0 capabilities to further improve their inventions, medical entrepreneurs are increasingly customizing ANSYS solutions to their clinical needs.

Attend this webinar to learn how two entrepreneurial clinical groups have adapted ANSYS software for new medical treatments. Discover how BRACESIM, developed by Rodin 4d, assists orthotists in customizing braces to treat scoliosis, decreasing the number of physical iterations needed to get the right brace, while reducing brace weight and increasing patient satisfaction. And find out how WOST, created by Sim & Cure, provides crucial assistance to neurosurgeons treating cerebral aneurysms by performing patient-specific stent development in less than 15 seconds.

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What are Healthcare Thought Leaders Foreseeing for 2016?
by Thierry Marchal, ANSYS

Patients and healthcare professionals have great expectations that 2016 will make some of the major medical advances talked about in 2015 available to clinicians. Thought leaders in healthcare clinical practice and in the medical device field are predicting major progress in the medical Internet of Things (Medical IoT), in silico clinical trials and personalized medicine.

Attend this webinar to meet some of these healthcare innovators and learn about their thoughts and expectations for 2016. What developments can we reasonably expect to see in this field in the coming months, and how will engineering simulation accelerate new devices to market? By interviewing a few key thought leaders in this webinar, we will help you gain some deep insight into major initiatives that will advance healthcare in the near future.

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Quality by Design: Using Simulation for Biotech and Pharmaceutical Mixing Tank Scale-Up: No Need of CAE Experts Anymore
by Shital Joshi, ANSYS

Mixing tank design scale-up has traditionally required a large number of CAE experts. While engineering simulation has strongly reduced development costs and time to market, using CAE experts made this task increasingly cost-prohibitive, until now. Join us for this webinar to discover how the ANSYS India team, working with some pharma and biotech leaders, developed a simplified, customized interface for ANSYS Fluent that enables non-expert users to set up advanced mixing tank modeling. Learn how this innovative mixing tank template allows new users to gain simulation experience, while freeing up CAE experts for more advanced tasks.

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Quality by Design: The Strategic Role of Simulation in this Essential Pharmaceutical Initiative
by Yogesh Waghmare, Genzyme, a Sanofi Company and Marc Horner, ANSYS

Quality by Design (QbD) is a concept encouraged by the FDA that integrates quality into a product through understanding of both the product and the process by which it was manufactured. This webinar will provide an introduction to the application of CFD tools in the biopharmaceutical industry and will continue with two case studies. Both case studies will focus on designing production-scale bioreactors using CFD. The first will summarize a DOE-based design of bioreactor to optimize gas sparging, and the second will describe a methodology to engineer and design a production-scale bioreactor that reduces the risk of scaling-up a microcarrier-based mammalian cell culture process.

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VHP-Female Computational Human Phantom and Its Use in ANSYS HFSS and ANSYS Maxwell 3-D

It’s a challenge to model the human body’s interaction with electromagnetic, structural, thermal and acoustic stimuli. One large limitation is the availability of anatomically accurate and numerically efficient computational phantoms. In this study, we disclose a new computational phantom designed specfically for ANSYS HFSS and ANSYS Maxwell 3-D.

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AirPROM: Airway Disease Predicting Outcomes through Patient Specific Computational Modelling
by Ian Jones, ANSYS

AirPROM (Airway Disease Predicting Outcomes through Patient Specific Computational Modeling) is a five year European project; it aims to produce computer and physical models of the whole airway system for people with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Using a model of a patient’s own airway system and simulating its functionality through software could help to improve diagnoses, treatments and outcomes for people suffering from these conditions.

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In Silico Modeling of the Cardiovascular System

Use of in silico, patient-specific models has become popular for both the design of medical devices and personalized therapies. In silico, or computer-simulated, models based on medical imaging of the cardiovascular system can provide invaluable data on the in vivo environment, where medical devices are deployed and surgery is carried out, and can predict outcomes of alternative therapeutic interventions for individual patients.

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How ANSYS SpaceClaim Will Help You Streamline In Silico Testing and Computer Aided Surgery
by Rebecca Dilthey and John Graham, ANSYS

Customizing surgical treatments and medical devices by incorporating patient-specific geometries in simulations opens the door to better, more successful healthcare. Patient-specific geometries typically come from medical scans — MRI, PET, CT — and they often require preprocessing for accurate simulations. In this webinar, we will discuss how ANSYS SpaceClaim provides the medical community with new techniques to make editing of patient-specific geometries faster and easier, leading to better treatment planning and more successful outcomes.

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Functional Respiratory Imaging: Accelerating Clinical Research
by Jan Debacker, CEO, FLUIDDA

By combining High Resolution CT Thorax (HRCT) imaging and flow simulation (CFD), FLUIDDA has developed Functional Respiratory Imaging (FRI). FRI provides local information about the lung structure (using HRCT measurement) and function (using ANSYS CFD). This combination of imaging technology and engineering simulation was applied to more than 1,500 patients suffering from various pathologies, including asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis, chronic sinusitis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and others. For these patients, FRI provides a more detailed picture of how their treatment is working, and guides physicians to choose the optimal next steps for improved outcomes.

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Implementing a Microstructure-enhanced Material Model using ANSYS USERMAT for the Prediction of Bone Failure
by Javad Hazrati, TU/e & Davide Fugazza, ANSYS Belgium

Continuum FE models of bones and bone-implant configurations have become a standard tool to estimate bone strength. These models are usually based on clinical CT scans. In virtually all of these models, material properties assigned to the bone elements are chosen as isotropic with a stiffness based only on the density distribution. It has been shown, however, that trabecular bone can be highly anisotropic and it shows elastic plastic damage mechanical behaviour with softening.

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