Developing High Performance, Reliable Turbochargers with Computational Fluid Dynamics

Turbochargers are key components of car and truck engines. They increase the power output of the engine, and are therefore important in the development of smaller and lighter engines, which is a major goal for automotive and truck manufacturers. Key challenges associated with the development of high performance, reliable turbochargers include:

  • Designing the most efficient volute and blades for maximum efficiency
  • Testing the entire operating condition envelope
  • Ensuring the turbocharger’s structural integrity

ANSYS solutions allow companies to design high performance, high reliability turbochargers thanks to unique and leading simulation technologies, including:

  • A 2-D throughflow solver that provides rapid initial analysis of rotating machinery before proceeding to more rigorous and detailed 3-D fluid flow simulations
  • An easy-to-use tool for the rapid 3-D design of rotating machinery components
  • A fast and reliable CFD solver to predict, with confidence and high accuracy, the performance of the turbocharger
  • The ability to automate the simulations of hundreds of design and operating conditions as well as design optimization solutions
  • The ability to perform both fluid dynamics and structural simulations for stress and modal analysis to ensure the structural integrity of the turbocharger

Static pressure rise through the compressor stage
Static pressure rise through the compressor stage as well as the level of mesh and flow detail provided by simulation (Courtesy of Cummins Turbo Technologies)

Flow conditions at operating point between choke and surge.
Flow conditions at operating point between choke and surge. This demonstrates the performance impact of tip-clearance effects on velocity at various flow rates. Speeds shown refer to tip speed. (Courtesy PCA Engineers Limited)

Maximum stress is in the bore and is arranged to be away from the contact zone
Maximum stress is in the bore and is arranged to be away from the contact zone. As the impeller runs up in speed, it leans forward at the rim and shortens axially. ( Courtesy PCA Engineers Limited)