ANSYS Workshop

Western Pennsylvania ANSYS User Group

March 25, 2019

8:30 AM - 3:30 PM (EST)

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Venue:
Uber ATG Development Center
3011 Smallman St.
Pittsburgh, PA 15201
United States

Contact:
Krista Loeffler

Innovation enables organizations to open new avenues of product differentiation by customizing products. In today’s rapidly changing business environment, engineers must innovate quickly to incorporate new features while reducing development costs and delivering new products to the market before the competition. Simulation plays a key role in helping engineers drive innovation, enabling complete virtual prototypes of complex systems to be validated across all physics and engineering disciplines.

Join us for the Western Pennsylvania User Group in Pittsburgh this Spring! You will learn how to incorporate various productivity enhancement tools and techniques into your engineering department’s workflow as well as network with other technical professionals in the area. ANSYS application engineers and current users will share their experience with simulation.

Agenda

Time Topic
8:30 AM - 9:00 AM Registration and Breakfast
9:00 AM - 10:00 AM Keynote Address:
Hardware Analysis of Autonomous Vehicles

Bob Terhune, Matt Wojnas, Becca Stokes, Uber Advanced Technologies Group
10:00 AM - 10:25 AM Granta Design Materials Database Implementation within the Engineering Data Library and ANSYS Cloud
Shawn Catlin, ANSYS
January 2019: ANSYS acquires Granta Design
February 2019: Access HPC Cloud Services Without Leaving the ANSYS Simulation Workflow
10:25 AM - 10:40 AM Break
10:40 AM - 11:05 AM Thermal Analysis of a High Temperature Coaxial Dielectric Test Cell
Robert Tempke, GRA at West Virginia University. Advisor: Dr. Terence Musho, PE
11:05 AM - 11:30 AM Derivation of a Calibration Curve for Fatigue Crack Measurement
Joel Lindsay at West Virginia University. Advisor: Dr. Terence Musho, PE
11:30 AM - 12:00 PM ANSYS Mechanical - Sneak Peek at 2019 R2
Richard Mitchell, ANSYS
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Lunch
1:00 PM - 1:25 PM ANSYS Mechanical Convergence Tool
John Doyle, ANSYS
1:25 PM - 1:50 PM Structural Optimization and Dynamic Behavior Assessment of a Flexural Spring Assisted Free Piston Oscillating Linear Engine Alternator (OLEA)
Nima Zamani Meymian, West Virginia University Ph. D. candidate. Faculty advisor: Dr. Gregory Thompson
1:50 PM - 2:05 PM Break
2:05 PM - 2:30 PM Development of Stochastic Model for Determining Material Properties of Composite Microstructures using ANSYS APDL
Penn State Erie, Mechanical Engineering senior: Randall Doles. Faculty advisor: Dr. Sanei
2:30 PM - 2:55 PM ECS Rotor Test Stand
Penn State Erie, Mechanical Engineering Technology seniors: Caleb Moyer, William Rahenkamp, and David Fredley. Faculty advisor: Mr. Phil Jones
2:55 PM - 3:20 PM Load Fixture Design
Penn State Erie, Mechanical Engineering Technology seniors: Shawn Mehaffey, Jonathan Klase, and Robert Holder. Faculty advisor: Mr. Phil Jones
3:20 PM - 3:45 PM CFD Modeling for Biomedical Applications
Mark Goodin and Stephen Conover, SimuTech Group, Inc.

Abstracts

Hardware Analysis of Autonomous Vehicles
Bob Terhune, Matt Wojnas, Becca Stokes, Uber Advanced Technologies Group

Highlights of autonomous hardware systems and their associated FEA and CFD simulations. A deep dive into the Fluent CFD analysis of our autonomous vehicle and sensor package. An overview of the synergy of simulation results and physical testing.

Thermal Analysis of a High Temperature Coaxial Dielectric Test Cell
Robert Tempke, GRA at West Virginia University. Advisor: Dr. Terence Musho, PE

This study uses FEA to design a high-temperature coaxial test cell for the testing of temperature dependent dielectric properties of powdery materials. This study employs ANSYS Mechanical Workbench with both the Thermal and Structural solver. A critical design aspect was maintaining the temperature of coaxial cables that connect to the test cell near room temperature. In designing and analyzing the test cell using FEA it was determined that a water-cooled heat sink was required to achieve this temperature requirement. Film coefficients and flow rates were determined based on parametric studies conducted using the thermal solver. Moreover, a critical aspect of the design that was initially overlooked was the temperature of the center electrode. The solution involved incorporating quartz spacer in the design to dissipate the heat of the center electrode. The FEA results were experimentally validated by ramping the temperature from room temperature to 500 °C, holding at 100°C, 200°C, 300°C, 400°C, and 500°C for one hour each and measuring the temperature at the heat sinks and center electrodes.

Derivation of a Calibration Curve for Fatigue Crack Measurement
Joel Lindsay at West Virginia University. Advisor: Dr. Terence Musho, PE

This study uses FEA to relate the potential drop across a small crack to the crack length in nickel-based superalloys. In order to determine this geometry specific relationship between potential and crack length, a calibration curve is derived using ANSYS Mechanical Workbench with the Electrostatic solver. The calibration curve is employed in an in-situ measurement of crack length using a direct current potential drop (DCPD) method. Parametric sweeps of parameterized crack length were conducted within Workbench. Results were validated and verified through comparison with the industry standard Johnson equation and through measurement of the final crack length. Experimental validation was carried out for three different loading cycles of 1600N, 1700N, and 1800N with multiple samples for each loading. The FEA derived calibration curve was in good agreement with the Johnson equation with increased accuracy at longer crack lengths.

ANSYS Mechanical - Sneak Peek at 2019 R2
Richard Mitchell, ANSYS

2019 R2 will see a leap forward in the user interface for ANSYS Mechanical. Customization, new menus enhanced search and all new look and feel will improve your user experience in Mechanical. There are also many other significant advances that will make 2019 R2 one of the biggest updates Mechanical has ever seen.

ANSYS Mechanical Convergence Tool
John Doyle, ANSYS

The 'Convergence Tool' is an automatic mesh refinement tool to arrive at an optimal mesh density based on critical user defined results. It can be linear or nonlinear and is most practical for models that are well constrained and easy to converge. It has been around for many releases.

Structural Optimization and Dynamic Behavior Assessment of a Flexural Spring Assisted Free Piston Oscillating Linear Engine Alternator (OLEA)
Nima Zamani Meymian, West Virginia University Ph. D. candidate. Faculty advisor: Dr. Gregory Thompson

The current research has been carried out to analyze the dynamic performance for an Oscillating Linear Engine Alternator (OLEA) OLEA with 22 mm stroke length and a speed of between 60-70 Hz. The engine assembly consists of a single cylinder two-stroke natural gas engine which, in absence of the crank mechanism, produce the linear motion for the alternator. From the engine perspective, increasing stroke length and speed improve the engine compression ratio and will result in increased net output power. For a single cylinder LEA the usage of spring system is essential for rebounding the piston during the compression stroke. The core of the proposed research is the study of the dynamic behavior of the LEA incorporating flexure springs as the main suspension components of the LEA and introduction of methods and strategies to enhance the overall efficiency of the LEA. The current LEA design has considerable mechanical energy losses; these losses include aerodynamic drag and friction. The current design has a design objective life of 10 continuous years with only yearly maintenance. Both efficiency and life targets have been challenging. In the current design, flexure springs are amongst the components that can be optimized for achieving the final targets. Preliminary FEA results have shown that modifications in the design and application of the flexure springs within the LEA can improve their efficiency and life. This research will investigate the design and dynamic behavior of a flexure-spring-assisted LEA in detail to enhance the efficiency of the LEA.

Development of Stochastic Model for Determining Material Properties of Composite Microstructures using ANSYS APDL
Penn State Erie, Mechanical Engineering senior: Randall Doles. Faculty advisor: Dr. Sanei

This research was performed to assess the variation in material properties of various composite microstructures based on variable inputs. In the first model, the goal was to analyze the variation in the ultimate strength of composite structures based on changes in the special placement of fibers. Continuous carbon fiber composite microstructures were randomly generated and all anisotropic material properties were determined. Based on these properties, a macroscale model was generated to analyze the effect of changes to material properties on failure progression. From these tests, a distribution was calculated to provide a generalized ultimate strength based on changes in fiber placement. In the second model, carbon nanotubes models were analyzed to determine how material properties vary depending on the size of the model. Each carbon nanotube was given a diameter of 100nm. Model sizes varying from 10um to 100um were analyzed for their material properties. Each model could be generated from three possible microstructure types: Straight or wavy fibers, aligned or random fibers, and agglomerated or not agglomerated fibers. The results showed a general decrease in the standard deviation with an increase in the microstructure size, at the cost of computational resources.

ECS Rotor Test Stand
Penn State Erie, Mechanical Engineering Technology seniors: Caleb Moyer, William Rahenkamp, and David Fredley. Faculty advisor: Mr. Phil Jones

A modal analysis is performed to evaluate the current level of natural frequency in an existing eddy current separator (ECS) test stand with a project goal to raise the natural frequency above 5000 RPM or 83 Hz. The current design must accommodate rotors in length from 24 to 80 inches and weigh from 500 to 2900 pounds. The rotors operate at speeds up to 4500 RPM. A new test stand is designed, as well as modifications to the existing test stand, to raise the natural frequency above 83 Hz.

CFD Modeling for Biomedical Applications
Mark Goodin and Stephen Conover, SimuTech Group, Inc.

CFD modeling related to the total artificial heart and airway, including an introduction to the new ASME V&V40 standard related the computational modeling of medical devices

Attendee Information

All attendees must sign the Uber ATG Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA) as they arrive at the meeting registration table.

Due to the sensitive nature of work performed at Uber's facilities, if you are attending this meeting you will be required to sign Uber's on-site Non-Disclosure Agreement. To be clear, this agreement will not cover what you are learning in the ANSYS User Group meeting. It is intended to protect Uber's innovations and intellectual property regarding information you may see or hear during your visit for our meeting. If you have questions or concerns, feel free to contact Bob Terhune <bterhune@uber.com>

We will send a copy of the NDA to registered attendees prior to the meeting so you can review it, then as you arrive for the meeting, you can sign a group NDA sheet.

PARKING

There are several lots around the Smallman St. building available for attendees to park in for free. Alternative parking can be found in the overflow lot on 33rd Street or you may choose to pay for street/lot parking.