High-Tech Erases Industry Boundaries

By Sudhir Sharma, Global Industry Director, High-Tech, ANSYS

Massive changes over the past few decades are challenging designers and manufacturers who innovate connectivity and electronics functionality in products across all industries.

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Sudhir Sharma

"An incalculable number of examples of connectivity and electronics functionality are changing the product design landscape across industries."

Massive changes over the past few decades are challenging designers and manufacturers who innovate products. The automotive industry is racing toward autonomous vehicles. The healthcare industry is adopting personalized medicine. And the industrial sector is on track to improve equipment performance through prescriptive maintenance. Most household appliances include electronics components. An incalculable number of examples of connectivity and electronics functionality are changing the product design landscape across industries.

In the consumer market, product innovation is driven by consumer demand for new and better functions, features and conveniences, which, in turn, requires even more advanced technology. In the industrial sector, high-tech is an enabler of industrial automation, which helps businesses save time and money and thus increase the need for more automation to remain competitive.

The digital revolution has impacted virtually every industry.

A key to this digital revolution is computing power, which has, by some estimates, increased by 1 trillion times over the last 60 years. An iPhone 5 is estimated to be 2.7 times faster than a circa 1985 Cray-2 supercomputer. With everincreasing computing power, we have been able to solve complex algorithms and implement new ideas far more quickly than would have been possible otherwise. The innovations have come cascading down in virtually all scientific domains — from materials science to biotechnology to energy harvesting.

Another key is connectivity, which was first enabled by basic computer networking and now by the internet. At present, over 4 billion people actively use the internet and 51 percent of internet traffic comes from mobile devices. Global mobile data traffic is expected to grow to 49 exabytes (1 exabyte = 1018 bytes) per month by 2021, which amounts to an astounding 47 percent compound annual growth rate from 2016. Data has become the currency of the modern economy, enabling smart operations and remote control for home and commercial products.

Engineering simulation has also evolved to accelerate the development of high-tech products. Today’s biggest graphics processing units (GPU) and even artificial intelligence chips are being built using machine-learning-based simulation tools from ANSYS.

Simulation is also being leveraged to develop the fifth generation (5G) of wireless communication technology. 5G is expected to unleash the promise of the Internet of Things (IoT) by providing enhanced mobile broadband, high reliability and low latency communication, and support for massive amounts of data exchange. 5G will supercharge virtual reality, autonomous vehicles and smart city applications.

This Best of High-Tech issue of ANSYS Advantage presents many recent industry examples that highlight engineering excellence and the value of simulation. Qualcomm applies simulation to keep smartphones cool, an automotive supplier ensures that vehicle electronics work reliably, companies develop new technology for 5G with the assistance of simulation and AMD reduces chip power by 70 percent. This issue features these stories and many other examples.

No matter in which industry you work, you will see more and more high-tech. It has become a requirement to be successful and engineering simulation is key to developing these products.

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