Sports Industry Webcast Series: The Contribution of Simulation to 21st-Century Sport Engineering

Sports professionals, coaches and amateur participants always explore ways to boost performance, ensure comfort and minimize the risk of injury. At the same time, sporting equipment manufacturers must investigate technologies to innovate faster and maximize the reliability of products that sometimes face extremely challenging conditions.

Engineering has long been one of the tools used, but, for the past few years, the sport engineering community has been paying closer attention to engineering simulation. Through computer-based modeling, it is possible to determine and understand how influential parameters impact athletic performance, or minimize or amplify injuries.

On-Demand Webinars

Which cyclist’s hill descent position is really superior? Froome, Pantani, Nibali or Sagan? New Results!
By Professor Bert Blocken, Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) in the Netherlands and KU Leuven and the University of Liege in Belgium

Different professional cyclists use very different hill descent positions, and there is no consensus in the peloton on which position is truly superior. Most cyclists did not test different positions in wind tunnels to find which one would give them the greatest aerodynamic advantage. This valuable information could be the difference between winning and losing a major cycling event.

Join us for this webinar in which we will discuss which cyclist’s hill descent position is aerodynamically superior by comparing 14 positions used by professional riders in the past. Using two different and independently applied research methods — wind-tunnel testing and CFD simulations (which yield the same conclusions) — we have arrived at the answer scientifically. Learn which positions are superior from safety and power generation viewpoints. Here’s a tantalizing hint: The infamous “Froome” position during the Peyresourde descent of Stage 8 of the 2016 Tour de France is 8 percent slower, provides unequal distribution of body weight over both wheels and reduces power generation. Attend this webinar to discover new results that contradict those announced previously via LinkedIn.

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Reducing the Risk of Concussion Through Personalized Helmet Design
By Ross Cotton, Simpleware Synopsys; Bence Gerber and Chris Quan, ANSYS

Concussions and other head injuries are significant issues in modern sports involving head impact. The long-term viability of these sports is being called into question because of the severity of the brain injuries that affect players long after their careers have ended. A highly realistic 3-D head model has been developed by Simpleware Ltd. from MRI data using novel segmentation and image-based meshing techniques. ANSYS Mechanical simulations are being used with this head model to evaluate and optimize the performance of next-generation protective head gear.

Attend this webinar to investigate the potential of image-based 3-D modeling from scan data (such as CT and MRI) for better understanding of damage to the brain and the performance of protective headgear. By analyzing the shockwaves generated in the model of the head and a football helmet using ANSYS Mechanical, engineers are learning how to optimize helmet designs, including the materials used to manufacture them, so they can absorb more of the shock that would normally reach the brain and reduce sudden stress amplification from shock reflection.

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The Secret of Speedo's Successful Innovation: Hard Work, Creativity and...Simulation
By Rob Blenkinsopp, Speedo

The Speedo brand is recognized for its creativity and technical superiority illustrated by unbelievable successes at various major events. The continuous use of advanced technology such as engineering simulation was and is still playing a key role to innovate more and faster than others. Winning a competitive edge whilst complying to more constraining regulations requires the optimization of every detail, a process that is very challenging and time consuming to achieve through experimental testing only.

Rob Blenkinsopp (Speedo) and Stephen Silvester (ANSYS) will share the motivations and expectations behind the adoption of engineering simulation for improving swimming equipment for elite athletes. They will review some advanced applications of simulation, discussing the challenges they experienced and some valuable outputs they collected.

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Designing Manufacturing and Testing an Olympic Kayak: Could Anybody Do It?
By Twan van Hooff, KU Leuven, Belgium and Juliano Fujioka Mologni, ESSS, Brazil

Designing a race kayak is not a trivial task, as the performance of the kayak is influenced by both its hydrodynamics and aerodynamics, as well as its interaction with the athlete. Furthermore, a kayak’s design is a subtle compromise between its performance (speed and stability) and its structural integrity (resistance to drop/dent). Finally, the manufacturing of the kayak, possibly by blow molding or thermoforming, should be optimized to meet all design objectives (speed, stability and structural integrity).

Attend this webinar to learn how to use engineering simulation to model the different stages of designing a kayak, including its interaction with water, air, the athlete and any surrounding obstacles. Discover how multiphysics design with the new ANSYS AIM software — including ANSYS SpaceClaim capabilities for pre-processing — can be used in combination with the ANSYS Polyflow environment to optimize the manufacturing process.

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Can a Better Understanding of Aerodynamics Change the Result of a Cycling Race, or Minimize the Risk of a Dramatic Accident?

In the world of professional cycling, individual time trials and team time trials are often the most impressive and decisive stages in important multistage races, such as the Tour de France, the Giro d’Italia and the Vuelta a Espana. While a lot of research and money is being invested in training riders and improving the equipment, teams still lack knowledge about the aerodynamics of individual cyclists or the interactions with the other riders and following vehicles.

ANSYS CFD solutions are being used to analyze these aerodynamic effects to optimize the performance of cyclists, whether alone or in a pack. Attend this webinar to learn from Professor Bert Blocken of Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands and KU Leuven University in Belgium about the new research results on cycling aerodynamics that his team and their colleagues from Université de Liège have obtained in recent months.

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Getting Ready for the UEFA Euro 2016 Championship: Ball Aerodynamics, Stadium Stability and Communication Reliability
By Twan van Hooff, KU Leuven, Belgium and Juliano Fujioka Mologni, ESSS, Brazil

This year, the Stade de France in Paris will be the main stadium for the UEFA Euro tournament held every four years to determine the best national football (soccer) team in Europe. While the players have been training to get in the best shape possible for this important series, the engineers who design the stadiums have been running simulations to maximize the safety, comfort and functionality of the stadiums for the players, fans and news media.

Attend this webinar to learn from Dr. Twan van Hooff of KU Leuven University in Belgium how he used ANSYS CFD to analyze wind patterns and their impact on stadium stability, natural ventilation and keeping people dry on a rainy day. Also, Dr. Juliano Mologni from ESSS in Brazil will review how ANSYS electromagnetic simulation solutions help ensure stable communications in a complex stadium crowded with signals from television crews, cell phones, and cameras that help referees make the right call.

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Améliorer les performances sportives et réduire le risque de blessures grâce à l’utilisation de la simulation numérique

Si aujourd’hui la simulation numérique est devenue une technologie essentielle dans des domaines tels que l’aéronautique, le nucléaire, l’automobile, et par extension le sport automobile ; son utilisation par les équipementiers sportifs reste l’apanage d’une minorité. Néanmoins, le nombre de publications démontrant l’amélioration des performances dans des sports tels que la natation, la voile, le cyclisme, le golf, les sports de glisse, … se multiplient.

Ce webinar a pour objectif d’expliquer aux différents acteurs du monde du sport (équipementiers, athlètes, autorités régulatrices) ce qu’est la simulation numérique et quels en sont les bénéfices. Nous verrons également comment diverses associations à travers le monde, l’utilisent dans le but de tester différentes solutions et ainsi de sélectionner soit les plus performantes, soit celles qui minimiseront le risque de blessure pour les sportifs amateurs ou professionnels.

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The Ball is in Your Court
By Tom Allen, Manchester Metropolitan University & John Hart, Sheffield Hallam University

The moment of impact between tennis ball and racket, as viewed through computer simulations, reveals how crucial this encounter is to resulting flight of the ball. The same can be said for the shuttlecock in badminton. Modern predictive models show that improvements in tennis rackets — which primarily focus on reduced mass and increased structural stiffness — produced a 17.5 percent improvement in serving speed between 1870 and today. Making further improvements requires more complex and less obvious changes — such as the coefficient of friction (COF) between the strings and the ball, as well as the position of the racket’s balance point.

Attend this webinar to learn about the latest in tennis equipment simulations from Tom Allen of Manchester Metropolitan University, and badminton simulations from John Hart of Sheffield Hallam University. Discover how their in-depth investigations using computer-based models to study tennis and badminton could play a key role in the future development of these popular sports.

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Will CFD Influence the Winner of the Tour de France

The team time trial stage in the Tour de France, or any major race, is always impressive because of the speed of each team and the excellent coordination between the athletes. Victory in this stage requires a lot of training, proper team collaboration and balance between the strongest performers and the weakest ones. The cycling world has been paying attention to CFD for years to improve the aerodynamics of a single cyclist. Now, recent investigations led by Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands have modeled the interactions between several cyclists with special attention to a full team during a team time trial. Very insightful conclusions were reached to help leading teams refine their tactics.

Attend this webinar to discover how engineering simulation and CFD are now increasingly being used in cycling, not just to improve the performances of the bicycles themselves but to help the athletes adjust their positions for optimal results. Learn how wind engineering and airflow studies using CFD have led to calls for adjusting the rules about trailing cars to ensure a fair race. As the performances of these amazing athletes converge, the race may someday be won in front of the computer. This webinar will review some recent progress in cycling and its immediate impacts on the Tour de France.

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Reducing the Risk of Concussion Through Personalized Helmet Design

Concussions and other head injuries are significant issues in modern sports involving head impact. The long-term viability of these sports is being called into question because of the severity of the brain injuries that affect players long after their careers have ended. A highly realistic 3-D head model has been developed by Simpleware Ltd. from MRI data using novel segmentation and image-based meshing techniques. ANSYS Mechanical simulations are being used with this head model to evaluate and optimize the performance of next-generation protective head gear.

Attend this webinar to investigate the potential of image-based 3-D modeling from scan data (such as CT and MRI) for better understanding of damage to the brain and the performance of protective headgear. By analyzing the shockwaves generated in the model of the head and a football helmet using ANSYS Mechanical, engineers are learning how to optimize helmet designs, including the materials used to manufacture them, so they can absorb more of the shock that would normally reach the brain and reduce sudden stress amplification from shock reflection.

Download Recording