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Presentation

Advances in Turbulence Modeling at ANSYS

From 2012 Automotive Simulation World Congress: Turbulence modeling significantly impacts accuracy and cost of industrial CFD simulation. While virtual simulation is based mainly on Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, certain classes of flows are better covered by models in which all or part of the turbulence spectrum is resolved in at least a portion of the numerical domain, called scale-resolving simulation (SRS). This session presents an overview of turbulence modeling techniques along with key aspects of RANS and SRS modeling, including the strengths and issues of each. It also reviews SRS advances through a series of validation and industrial cases.

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Presentation

Confidence in Modeling SCR Aftertreatment Systems

From 2012 Automotive Simulation World Congress: Complete SCR system calculations require modeling of liquid spray atomization and decomposition, spray/wall interaction, and catalytic reactions inside the monolithic SCR catalyst. Detailed validation studies of urea/water spray decomposition and wall film formation are performed in ANSYS Fluent to establish the suitability of alternative modeling approaches. The SCR porous structure and detailed chemistry are computed in an aftertreatment modeling software, axisuite®, and coupled to ANSYS Fluent through user-defined functions. In contrast to CFD efforts that calculate inlet flow and NH3 uniformity, this approach evaluates complete system performance in terms of NOx emissions. The results demonstrate that NOx conversion efficiency in SCR catalyst channels is a complex function of local temperature, flow rate and species availability. With advanced UWS modeling and surface reaction UDFs, the use of CFD can be extended from traditional uniformity index calculations to emissions-oriented SCR system design optimization.

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Presentation

Model-Order Reduction for Thermal Management in Battery and Power Electronics

From 2012 Automotive Simulation World Congress: For cooling systems in battery and power electronics, CFD models have been used successfully, but transient CFD simulations are time consuming. When a systems-level simulation is desired, you need a thermal model that runs in a fraction of a second. To accommodate this, model-order reduction (MOR) can create a fast and accurate thermal model. This presentation is based on transfer function matching MOR. The transfer function of the thermal system is calculated numerically based on CFD results. Then a MOR is created such that it has the same transfer function. This can then be used to replace the original CFD model for fast transient thermal analysis and system-level thermal analysis.

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Presentation

Injector Dynamics Assumptions and Their Impact on Predicting Cavitation and Performance

From 2012 Automotive Simulation World Congress: For a transient fluid−structure interaction simulation of a current injector design, the geometry includes the injector’s nozzle and plunger, with the plunger being moved based on fluid forces in the axial direction. The simulation studies a full injection event, including filling of the sac via the volume of fluid (VoF) model, which allows for liquid fuel−air and liquid fuel−fuel vapor interactions. The overarching goal is to improve start-of injection (SOI) predictions and injector performance, investigate flow field inside the spray holes (studying cavitation and potential hysteresis effects), and gain a fundamental understanding of the injector process’ impact on emissions.

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Presentation

Cosimulation for Thermal Management and Vehicle Dynamics Applications

From 2012 Automotive Simulation World Congress: MpCCI provides a vendor-independent software interface for cosimulation, and this presentation discusses recent automotive applications: thermal behavior including convection, radiation and conduction in fluids and solid bodies. A coupled MBS-FEA-simulation approach is presented. One example is passing a road hole by the left front wheel. The corresponding tire is modeled with the FEA approach. The position as boundary condition is provided by the multibody model in MSC Adams. Both programs simulate in parallel and communicate through MpCCI. Another example outlines the benefits of coupling 1-D system codes with full 3-D CFD codes like ANSYS Fluent for HVAC circuits with detailed models of passenger cabins to get a more realistic feeling for the thermal comfort.

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Presentation

Optimization of Front-End Cooling Module for a Commercial Vehicle Using a CFD Approach

From 2012 Automotive Simulation World Congress: This presentation describes the effects of design actions using ANSYS Fluent on engine cooling performance of a commercial vehicle. The resistance of heat exchangers is considered using a porous modeling technique. The outlet temperature of intercooler charged air and radiator coolant is predicted along with amount of heat rejected by the intercooler and radiator. Air flow rate and air temperature at the entry and exit faces of intercooler and radiator are also predicted. This analysis helps to identify the air flow pattern in underhood and underbody regions for three vehicle conditions: idling, max torque and max power.

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Presentation

Scalable Storage and Data Management for Engineering Simulation

This presentation was what was presented as part of the IT Solutions webcast series.the webinar was designed to provide information provides recommendations on HW and system specification, best practice configuration, setup, management, roadmap and vision for planning. Information was presented on Industry trends & challenges: Smart Computing for product development by: • Prashant Avashia, Software Engineer, Systems and Technology Group, IBM • Simulation data management for engineering productivity • Sanjay Angadi, Senior Product Manager, ANSYS • Smart Storage ‐ scalable storage for simulation • Prashant Avashia, Software Engineer, Systems and Technology Group, IBM

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Webinars

Turbocharger Design and Analysis Best Practices using ANSYS Turbo Tools

Turbochargers are increasingly used on a wide range of vehicles as one means to improve fuel economy. Manufacturers are challenged to deliver reliable, high performance, efficient turbochargers with a wide operating range, and to do so in a short period of time. This webinar presents best practice usage of the ANSYS suite of turbomachinery design and analysis tools for turbochargers. The focus will be on the aerodynamics tools, and how usage of best practices enhances product development processes and the ability to meet performance and time requirements.

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Technical Brief

Automotive Hydraulic Pump Simulation

Automotive pumps take two forms: hydraulic and centrifugal. Hydraulic pumps are positive displacement pumps, with fl ow rate a direct function of rotational velocity. In the automotive industry, hydraulic pumps include gear pumps, gerotor pumps, vane pumps and piston pumps. Vehicle applications include fuel pumps, super-charging pumps, power-steering pumps, automatic transmission pumps and many others. Hydraulic pumps must be designed to avoid leakage and cavitation. Additional objectives include minimizing fuel noise and maximizing volumetric efficiency.

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White Papers

Optimizing Business Value in High-Performance Engineering Computing

To improve quality and reliability and to reduce cost and time-to-market, manufacturers and their supply chain are adopting engineering design and analysis approaches to tackle the ever-growing complexity and sophistication of multidisciplinary engineered products. However, the performance, scale and capabilities required for today’s engineering simulation workloads strain many legacy engineering HPC environments that previously were centered around an individual engineer’s desktop or a departmental IT resource. There is enormous stress placed on IT to deliver very high-performance computing and data management, and to protect intellectual property in an increasingly global collaborative and mobile world while improving IT efficiency.

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