www.speedo.com


ANSYS supports Speedo®'s revolutionary LZR RACER® suit features panels that reduce drag and are positioned precisely based on fluid flow analysis results simulated with technology from ANSYS. The software was used to guide, test and refine the final design of the suit. The majority of medals won and world records broken at the 2008 Olympics held in Beijing China were achieved by competitors wearing swimsuits designed in part with software from ANSYS.

Twenty-three out of 25 world records, 47 gold medals, and 89 percent of all swimming medals were won by athletes wearing the Speedo LZR RACER suit. Even prior to the Olympic swim competition, 52 world records were set in 2008, and 48 of those were accomplished by swimmers wearing Speedo LZR RACER suits.

Synonymous with swimwear, the iconic brand celebrates 80 years of dominance creating revolutionary new technologies, designs and innovations. In the 1920s, Speedo made history with the Racerback: the world's first non-wool suit. In 2008 Speedo redefines swimwear again with the LZR RACER®-- the fastest and most technologically advanced swimsuit ever created; meanwhile designer collaborations with Comme des GarAons put Speedo at the cutting edge of fashion design. As the world's leading swimwear brand, Speedo is passionate about life in and around the water, supporting swimming from beginners through to elite level, including the phenomenal Michael Phelps. Speedo is owned by Pentland Brands and distributed in over 170 countries around the world. For more information, visit www.speedo.com.

SPEEDO, the ARROW device, LZR PULSE and LZR RACER are registered trade marks of Speedo Holdings B.V. The LZR RACER suit has worldwide design rights and patents pending.


Software from ANSYS played a critical role in the development of the Speedo LZR RACER suit.


CFD technology from ANSYS was used to predict fluid flows around the body of an elite swimmer in the outstretched glide position (assumed immediately after the initial dive and following each lap’s turn off the pool wall) to identify areas where drag, and its slowing effect, is likely to occur. The images shows flow pathlines colored by local flow velocity.